Frequently Asked Questions



  • 1.Notification of Intent to Homeschool
  • A. At what age and how often must I file a Notice of Intent to Homeschool?
    NHN02-11-2015

    Upon the commencement of homeschooling for each child a Notice of Intent to Homeschool must be filed with the Superintendent of the school district in which the child lives.

    • The notification is submitted either when the child turns seven years of age or within 10 days of discontinuing another educational option (you must officially withdraw your child from the public school he/she is enrolled in to avoid truancy issues).
    • You do not have to file again unless the child or parent’s last name or address changes in which case you must file within 30 days of the change.
    • If you are a new resident in Nevada you must file within thirty days of establishing residence.
    • There is no longer a requirement to file annually when you homeschool your child in subsequent consecutive years.
  • B. What information should a parent of a homeschooled child submit to the superintendent of schools of county in which the child resides?
    NHN02-11-2015

    Nevada law (NRS 392.070) provides for a waiver of the compulsory attendance law if the parent submits a Notification of Intent to the Superintendent of the school district in which the child lives.

    • The notice must be prepared in accordance with the requirements set forth in NRS 388D.010-388D.070. The simple, one page Notification of Intent developed by NHN or the form by the Nevada Department of Education distributed by your school district, meet these requirements when completed and submitted.
    • Your own written documentation other than one of these forms that meets the requirements set forth in NRS 388D.020 & 388D.050 may be submitted to the district.
    • Information in a Notice of Intent to Homeschool in Nevada must include:
      • The full name, age, and gender of the child,
      • The name and address of the parent filing the notice,
      • A signed statement of responsibility,
      • An educational plan for the age and skill level of the child,
      • The name of the public school most recently attended by the child, if applicable, and
      • A privacy statement, if desired.
    • Click here for more information on submitting the NOI to Homeschool
  • C. When, where, and how do I turn in my notice of intent form?
    NHN02-11-2015

    By law, you may mail or hand-deliver your intent form to the local superintendent of schools district office. The local superintendent may have designated another office or location within the district for filing of the Notice of Intent to Homeschool which you may comply with if you choose, however, you are not obligated to do so. Many times the former “homeschool offices” (under old statutes no longer applicable) were located somewhere other than the district office making it difficult for the parent to file their intent forms expediently. That is why the “superintendent of schools” is stipulated in the new law (as of 2007).

     

    If you mail the intent form to your school district we recommend you do so by certified mail with a return receipt request. The district will mail you a written acknowledgment as proof of compliance with Nevada’s compulsory attendance laws. If you hand-deliver your intent form the district is required to provide a written acknowledgment upon receipt of your completed form.

     

    If you are removing your child from the public school or a private school mid-year you must submit the intent form to the superintendent of schools district office within 10 days of formally withdrawing your child from public or private school.  NOTE: Parents MUST sign a form or provide a letter to the public school the child is enrolled in before beginning to homeschool.  If you decide to homeschool during the summer before the start of the next school year, you generally do not have to officially withdraw your child from public school.  However, it is a good idea to check with your local school district office, when you submit the NOI to Homeschool, to ensure your child is not included on their roles after having been in public school.  Following this procedure will ensure that your child will not run the risk of being truant (NRS 392.130 to NRS 392.160).

     

    You may withdraw your child anytime, any day of the year, and follow the appropriate guidelines for Notifying as listed above. Some districts have policies in place about not withdrawing during the last 3 weeks of school and then re-enrolling elsewhere, but this is not applicable when filing to homeschool.

    For more information on filing the NOI to Homeschool as well as information on participating in public school classes, activities, or sports please visit our NOTICE OF INTENT page.

  • D. Where or how do I "enroll" my child to homeschool?
    Barbara Dragon29-04-2017

    You cannot enroll or sign up your child to homeschool with NHN or any other homeschool "support" group.  Rather, you as the parent, take full legal responsibility for the education of your own child and file a Notification of Intent to Homeschool with the school district in which the child lives when he/she turns age 7, moves into this state, or is withdrawn from public or private school.  You are then free to determine the education needs of your child, choose curriculum, tutors, classes, groups, or whatever is best, to meet those educational needs. We believe educating our children at home to be a natural extension of parenting, not some monumental task but something we do need to educate ourselves about to do

  • 2.Legal Standing
  • A. What are the applicable Nevada laws for homeschooling?
    NHN02-11-2015

    NOTE: New numbering of laws affecting NV Homeschooling went into effect June of 2016. The old homeschool laws NRS 392.700 and NRS 392.705 are now NRS 388D.010-070.   While the numbering may have changed, the wording contained in the homeschool laws has remained EXACTLY the same as the 2007 Homeschool Freedom Bill (SB  404).

     
    The following Nevada Revised Statutes apply to compulsory attendance in public school,
    exemption from compulsory attendance, a definition of homeschooling and requirements of the local
    school district.
    NRS 392.040 Attendance required for child between 7 and 18 years of age; minimum age required for kindergarten and first grade; waiver from attendance available for child 6 years of age; developmental screening test required to determine placement of certain children.
    1. Except as otherwise provided by law, each parent, custodial parent, guardian or other person in the State of Nevada having control or charge of any child between the ages of 7 and 18 years shall send the child to a public school during all the time the public school is in session in the school district in which the child resides unless the child has graduated from high school.

     NRS 392.070  Attendance excused for children in private school, homeschooled children and opt-in children. [Parts of this section were replaced in revision in 2015 by NRS 392.072 and 392.074.]  

    Attendance of a child required by the provisions of NRS 392.040 must be excused when:

          1.  The child is enrolled in a private school pursuant to chapter 394 of NRS;

          2.  A parent of the child chooses to provide education to the child and files a notice of intent to homeschool the child with the superintendent of schools of the school district in which the child resides in accordance with NRS 388D.020; or

          3.  The child is an opt-in child and notice of such has been provided to the school district in which the child resides or the charter school in which the child was previously enrolled, as applicable, in accordance with NRS 388D.110.

          [366:32:1956] — (NRS A 1999, 3316; 2003, 2961; 2005, 2825; 2007, 3035; 2015, 1844)

    NRS 388D.010  “Parent” defined.  As used in NRS 388D.010 to 388D.060, inclusive, “parent” means the parent, custodial parent, legal guardian or other person in this State who has control or charge of a child and the legal right to direct the education of the child.

          (Added to NRS by 2007, 3032; A 2011, 3063; 2013, 3283; 2015, 2103)—(Substituted in revision for part of NRS 392.700)

    NRS 388D.020  Notice of intent to homeschool; acknowledgement of notification.

          1.  If the parent of a child who is subject to compulsory attendance wishes to homeschool the child, the parent must file with the superintendent of schools of the school district in which the child resides a written notice of intent to homeschool the child. The Department shall develop a standard form for the notice of intent to homeschool. The form must not require any information or assurances that are not otherwise required by this section or other specific statute. The board of trustees of each school district shall, in a timely manner, make only the form developed by the Department available to parents who wish to homeschool their child.

          2.  The notice of intent to homeschool must be filed before beginning to homeschool the child or:

          (a) Not later than 10 days after the child has been formally withdrawn from enrollment in public school; or

          (b) Not later than 30 days after establishing residency in this State.

          3.  The purpose of the notice of intent to homeschool is to inform the school district in which the child resides that the child is exempt from the requirement of compulsory attendance.

          4.  If the name or address of the parent or child as indicated on a notice of intent to homeschool changes, the parent must, not later than 30 days after the change, file a new notice of intent to homeschool with the superintendent of schools of the school district in which the child resides.

          5.  A notice of intent to homeschool must include only the following:

          (a) The full name, age and gender of the child;

          (b) The name and address of each parent filing the notice of intent to homeschool;

          (c) A statement signed and dated by each such parent declaring that the parent has control or charge of the child and the legal right to direct the education of the child, and assumes full responsibility for the education of the child while the child is being homeschooled;

          (d) An educational plan for the child that is prepared pursuant to NRS 388D.050;

          (e) If applicable, the name of the public school in this State which the child most recently attended; and

          (f) An optional statement that the parent may sign which provides:

     I expressly prohibit the release of any information contained in this document, including, without limitation, directory information as defined in 20 U.S.C. § 1232g(a)(5)(A), without my prior written consent.

           6.  Each superintendent of schools of a school district shall accept notice of intent to homeschool that is filed with the superintendent pursuant to this section and meets the requirements of subsection 5, and shall not require or request any additional information or assurances from the parent who filed the notice.

          7.  The school district shall provide to a parent who files a notice a written acknowledgment which clearly indicates that the parent has provided notification required by law and that the child is being homeschooled. The written acknowledgment shall be deemed proof of compliance with Nevada’s compulsory school attendance law. The school district shall retain a copy of the written acknowledgment for not less than 15 years. The written acknowledgment may be retained in electronic format.

          (Added to NRS by 2007, 3032; A 2011, 3063; 2013, 3283; 2015, 2103)—(Substituted in revision for part of NRS 392.700)

    NRS 388D.030  Release of child’s records.  The superintendent of schools of a school district shall process a written request for a copy of the records of the school district, or any information contained therein, relating to a child who is being or has been homeschooled not later than 5 days after receiving the request. The superintendent of schools may only release such records or information:

          1.  To a person or entity specified by the parent of the child, or by the child if the child is at least 18 years of age, upon suitable proof of identity of the parent or child; or

          2.  If required by specific statute.

          (Added to NRS by 2007, 3032; A 2011, 3063; 2013, 3283; 2015, 2103)—(Substituted in revision for part of NRS 392.700)

    NRS 388D.040  Admittance or entrance to school; participation in examinations.

          1.  If a child who is or was homeschooled seeks admittance or entrance to any school in this State, the school may use only commonly used practices in determining the academic ability, placement or eligibility of the child. If the child enrolls in a charter school, the charter school shall, to the extent practicable, notify the board of trustees of the school district in which the child resides of the child’s enrollment in the charter school. Regardless of whether the charter school provides such notification to the board of trustees, the charter school may count the child who is enrolled for the purposes of the calculation of basic support pursuant to NRS 387.1223. A homeschooled child seeking admittance to public high school must comply with NRS 392.033.

          2.  A school or organization shall not discriminate in any manner against a child who is or was homeschooled.

          3.  Each school district shall allow homeschooled children to participate in all college entrance examinations offered in this State, including, without limitation, the SAT, the ACT, the Preliminary SAT and the National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test. Each school district shall ensure that the homeschooled children who reside in the school district have adequate notice of the availability of information concerning such examinations on the Internet website of the school district maintained pursuant to NRS 390.015.

          (Added to NRS by 2007, 3032; A 2011, 3063; 2013, 3283; 2015, 2103)—(Substituted in revision for part of NRS 392.700)

    NRS 388D.050  Educational plan.

          1.  The parent of a child who is being homeschooled shall prepare an educational plan of instruction for the child in the subject areas of English language arts, mathematics, science and social studies, including history, geography, economics and government, as appropriate for the age and level of skill of the child as determined by the parent.

          2.  The educational plan must be included in the notice of intent to homeschool filed pursuant to NRS 388D.020. If the educational plan contains the requirements of NRS 388D.020, the educational plan must not be used in any manner as a basis for denial of a notice of intent to homeschool that is otherwise complete. The parent must be prepared to present the educational plan of instruction and proof of the identity of the child to a court of law if required by the court.

          3.  This section does not require a parent to ensure that each subject area is taught each year that the child is homeschooled.

          (Added to NRS by 2007, 3032; A 2011, 3063; 2013, 3283; 2015, 2103)—(Substituted in revision for part of NRS 392.700)

    NRS 388D.060  Discrimination prohibited.  No regulation or policy of the State Board, any school district or any other governmental entity may infringe upon the right of a parent to educate his or her child based on religious preference unless it is:

          1.  Essential to further a compelling governmental interest; and

          2.  The least restrictive means of furthering that compelling governmental interest.

          (Added to NRS by 2007, 3032; A 2011, 3063; 2013, 3283; 2015, 2103)—(Substituted in revision for part of NRS 392.700)

    NRS 388D.070  Form for participation in programs and activities at public school or through Nevada Interscholastic Activities Association.

          1.  The Department shall develop a standard form for the notice of intent of a homeschooled child to participate in programs and activities. The board of trustees of each school district shall, in a timely manner, make only the form developed by the Department available to parents of homeschooled children.

          2.  The notice developed pursuant to subsection 1 must include the information required in the notice of intent to homeschool pursuant to NRS 388D.020, excluding the educational plan for the homeschooled child.

          3.  If a homeschooled child wishes to participate in classes, activities, programs, sports or interscholastic activities and events at a public school or through a school district, or through the Nevada Interscholastic Activities Association, the parent of the child must file a current notice of intent to participate with the school district in which the child resides.

          (Added to NRS by 2007, 3034)—(Substituted in revision for NRS 392.705)

     

    NRS 392.072  Participation of homeschooled children and opt-in children in programs of special education and related services; regulations.

          1.  The board of trustees of each school district shall provide programs of special education and related services for homeschooled children. The programs of special education and related services required by this section must be made available:

          (a) Only if a child would otherwise be eligible for participation in programs of special education and related services pursuant to NRS 388.417 to 388.469, inclusive, or NRS 388.5251 to 388.5267, inclusive;

          (b) In the same manner that the board of trustees provides, as required by 20 U.S.C. § 1412, for the participation of pupils with disabilities who are enrolled in private schools within the school district voluntarily by their parents or legal guardians; and

          (c) In accordance with the same requirements set forth in 20 U.S.C. § 1412 which relate to the participation of pupils with disabilities who are enrolled in private schools within the school district voluntarily by their parents or legal guardians.

          2.  The programs of special education and related services required by subsection 1 may be offered at a public school or another location that is appropriate.

          3.  The board of trustees of a school district may, before providing programs of special education and related services to a homeschooled child or opt-in child pursuant to subsection 1, require proof of the identity of the child, including, without limitation, the birth certificate of the child or other documentation sufficient to establish the identity of the child.

          4.  The Department shall adopt such regulations as are necessary for the boards of trustees of school districts to provide the programs of special education and related services required by subsection 1.

          5.  As used in this section, “related services” has the meaning ascribed to it in 20 U.S.C. § 1401.

          [366:32:1956] — (NRS A 1999, 3316; 2003, 2961; 2005, 2825; 2007, 3035; 2015, 1844) — (Substituted in revision for part of NRS 392.070)

    NRS 392.074  Participation of private school children, homeschooled children and opt-in children in classes and extracurricular activities.

          1.  Except as otherwise provided in subsection 1 of NRS 392.072 for programs of special education and related services, upon the request of a parent or legal guardian of a child who is enrolled in a private school or a parent or legal guardian of a homeschooled child or opt-in child, the board of trustees of the school district in which the child resides shall authorize the child to participate in any classes and extracurricular activities, excluding sports, at a public school within the school district if:

          (a) Space for the child in the class or extracurricular activity is available;

          (b) The parent or legal guardian demonstrates to the satisfaction of the board of trustees that the child is qualified to participate in the class or extracurricular activity; and

          (c) If the child is:

                 (1) A homeschooled child, a notice of intent of a homeschooled child to participate in programs and activities is filed for the child with the school district for the current school year pursuant to NRS 388D.070; or

                 (2) An opt-in child, a notice of intent of an opt-in child to participate in programs and activities is filed for the child with the school district for the current school year pursuant to NRS 388D.140.

    Ê If the board of trustees of a school district authorizes a child to participate in a class or extracurricular activity, excluding sports, pursuant to this subsection, the board of trustees is not required to provide transportation for the child to attend the class or activity. A homeschooled child or opt-in child must be allowed to participate in interscholastic activities and events governed by the Nevada Interscholastic Activities Association pursuant to chapter 385B of NRS and interscholastic activities and events, including sports, pursuant to subsection 3.

          2.  The board of trustees of a school district may revoke its approval for a pupil to participate in a class or extracurricular activity at a public school pursuant to subsection 1 if the board of trustees or the public school determines that the pupil has failed to comply with applicable statutes, or applicable rules and regulations of the board of trustees. If the board of trustees revokes its approval, neither the board of trustees nor the public school is liable for any damages relating to the denial of services to the pupil.

          3.  In addition to those interscholastic activities and events governed by the Nevada Interscholastic Activities Association pursuant to chapter 385B of NRS, a homeschooled child or opt-in child must be allowed to participate in interscholastic activities and events, including sports, if a notice of intent of a homeschooled child or opt-in child to participate in programs and activities is filed for the child with the school district for the current school year pursuant to NRS 388D.070 or 388D.140, as applicable. A homeschooled child or opt-in child who participates in interscholastic activities and events at a public school pursuant to this subsection must participate within the school district of the child’s residence through the public school which the child is otherwise zoned to attend. Any rules or regulations that apply to pupils enrolled in public schools who participate in interscholastic activities and events, including sports, apply in the same manner to homeschooled children and opt-in children who participate in interscholastic activities and events, including, without limitation, provisions governing:

          (a) Eligibility and qualifications for participation;

          (b) Fees for participation;

          (c) Insurance;

          (d) Transportation;

          (e) Requirements of physical examination;

          (f) Responsibilities of participants;

          (g) Schedules of events;

          (h) Safety and welfare of participants;

          (i) Eligibility for awards, trophies and medals;

          (j) Conduct of behavior and performance of participants; and

          (k) Disciplinary procedures.

          4.  If a homeschooled child or opt-in child participates in interscholastic activities and events pursuant to subsection 3:

          (a) No challenge may be brought by the Association, a school district, a public school or a private school, a parent or guardian of a pupil enrolled in a public school or a private school, a pupil enrolled in a public school or a private school, or any other entity or person claiming that an interscholastic activity or event is invalid because the homeschooled child or opt-in child is allowed to participate.

          (b) Neither the school district nor a public school may prescribe any regulations, rules, policies, procedures or requirements governing the eligibility or participation of the homeschooled child or opt-in child that are more restrictive than the provisions governing the eligibility and participation of pupils enrolled in public schools.

          5.  The board of trustees of a school district:

          (a) May, before authorizing a homeschooled child or opt-in child to participate in a class or extracurricular activity, excluding sports, pursuant to subsection 1, require proof of the identity of the child, including, without limitation, the birth certificate of the child or other documentation sufficient to establish the identity of the child.

          (b) Shall, before allowing a homeschooled child or opt-in child to participate in interscholastic activities and events governed by the Nevada Interscholastic Activities Association pursuant to chapter 385B of NRS and interscholastic activities and events pursuant to subsection 3, require proof of the identity of the child, including, without limitation, the birth certificate of the child or other documentation sufficient to establish the identity of the child.

          [366:32:1956] — (NRS A 1999, 3316; 2003, 2961; 2005, 2825; 2007, 3035; 2015, 1844) — (Substituted in revision for part of NRS 392.070)

     

    NRS 385.007  Definitions. [Effective July 1, 2016.]  As used in this title, unless the context otherwise requires:

          1.  “Achievement charter school” means a public school operated by a charter management organization, as defined in NRS 388B.020, an educational management organization, as defined in NRS 388B.030, or other person pursuant to a contract with the Achievement School District pursuant to NRS 388B.210 and subject to the provisions of chapter 388B of NRS.

          2.  “Department” means the Department of Education.

          3.  “Homeschooled child” means a child who receives instruction at home and who is exempt from compulsory attendance pursuant to NRS 392.070, but does not include an opt-in child.

          4.  “Limited English proficient” has the meaning ascribed to it in 20 U.S.C. § 7801(25).

          5.  “Opt-in child” means a child for whom an education savings account has been established pursuant to NRS 353B.850, who is not enrolled full-time in a public or private school and who receives all or a portion of his or her instruction from a participating entity, as defined in NRS 353B.750.

          6.  “Public schools” means all kindergartens and elementary schools, junior high schools and middle schools, high schools, charter schools and any other schools, classes and educational programs which receive their support through public taxation and, except for charter schools, whose textbooks and courses of study are under the control of the State Board.

          7.  “State Board” means the State Board of Education.

          8.  “University school for profoundly gifted pupils” has the meaning ascribed to it in NRS 388C.040.

          (Added to NRS by 1979, 1563; A 1997, 1840; 1999, 3289; 2003, 2958; 2003, 19th Special Session, 34; 2005, 2428; 2015, 1831, 3778, effective July 1, 2016)

     

  • B. Are there any Nevada Administrative Codes adopted by the State Board of Education that regulate homeschooling?
    NHN02-11-2015

    No. After the successful passage of Senate Bill 404 during the 2007 Legislative Session homeschooling no longer falls under the jurisdiction of the State Board of Education and former regulation numbers NAC 392.011-392.065 were declared void. Homeschools now operate solely under the Nevada Revised Statutes as a separate educational alternative to compulsory attendance in a public school.

    Senate Bill 404
    Sec. 9. The regulations adopted by the State Board of Education which are codified as NAC 392.011 to
    392.065, inclusive, are hereby declared void. In preparing the supplements to the Nevada Administrative
    Code on or after July 1, 2007, the Legislative Counsel shall remove those regulations.

  • C. Am I legally bound to file a Notification of Intent to Homeschool?
    Barbara Dragon18-10-2017

    NV state law (NRS 392.040) requires that all children be enrolled in a public school between the ages of 7 and 18 (unless they have graduated). NRS 392.070 excuses attendance in a public school when the child attends a private school or is homeschooled. For purposes of avoiding truancy/educational neglect charges, parents who choose to direct the education of their child outside the public or private school do so by legally filing a Notification of Intent to Homeschool.

    • The NOI to Homeschool is filed only once  with the public school superintendent in the school district where the child lives (unless you move or change education options), NRS 388D.020 Subsection 1, 2 & 4.
    • The NOI serves only to inform the school district that the child is exempt from enrollment in the public school, NRS 388D.020, Subsection 3.
    • Very minimal information is required to be submitted and any information included is, by law, confidential and may NOT be released to anyone without your permission, NRS 392.020, Subsection 5.
    • The NV homeschool law prevents the government from dictating what that education looks like and protects the parent's fundamental right to direct the education of their child as they see fit, NRS 388D.050.

    Further, under the homeschool law in NV the parent filing the NOI takes full responsibility for the child's education and that education is not tied to the government school system in anyway. You, the parent, make all the decisions for what an appropriate education for your child looks like based on his/her age and skill level as determined by YOU!  Nevada parents raise, nurture, and educate their child FREE from government intrusion into our homes or lives.

  • 3.Local School District and Homeschooling
  • A. What is the responsibility of the local school district regarding exemption from compulsory attendance of homeschooled children?
    NHN02-11-2015

    The compulsory attendance law is enforced by the local school district, however

    • If the superintendent of schools of a local school district receives a Notice of Intent to Homeschool from the “parent having control or charge of any child between the ages of 7 and 18”, the superintendent of schools must excuse the child from compulsory attendance in the public school.
    • There is no approval process on the part of the local superintendent. If the notification contains the information required by law the superintendent must accept the notification and may not require or request any additional information or assurances from the parent.
    • Upon receiving a Notice of Intent to Homeschool the school district must provide a “written acknowledgment" which clearly indicates that the parent has provided the notification required by law and that the child is being homeschooled.
    • The written acknowledgment shall be “deemed proof of compliance with Nevada’s compulsory school attendance law”. The district shall retain a physical or electronic copy of the acknowledgment for not less than 15 years.
  • B. Does the local superintendent of schools have to “approve” the educational plan for a homeschooled child?
    NHN02-11-2015

    No. As stated above, the law does not require or authorize the local superintendent to approve the educational plan for a homeschooled child (see NRS 388D.030 & 388D.050). When a parent assumes full responsibility for the education of the child while the child is being homeschooled” (NRS 388D.020 [5c]) the parent is responsible for the academic progress of the child who is being homeschooled. The superintendent of schools for the local school district is not authorized to monitor the academic plan for the child.

     

    Furthermore, the purpose of the Notice of Intent to Homeschool is to inform the school district that the child is exempt from compulsory attendance in public school (NRS 388D.020[3]).  If a Notice of Intent to Homeschool does not contain information required by law then the school district may contact the parent for the missing information. Any educational plan that includes the basic subjects required in law (as appropriate for the age and skill level of the child as determined by the parent) MUST be accepted.

     

    After filing the Notice of Intent to Homeschool with the school district, a parent must be prepared to provide an educational plan and proof of identity (only when required by a court of lawNRS392.700 #12). This educational plan must include the subjects required by law as appropriate for the age and skill level of the child, as determined by the parent, at the time of the court  request. However, the law does not require that every subject listed in law be taught every year the child is homeschooled. The requirement for the parent to "prepare an educational plan of instruction" does not necessarily mean written preparation each year, as explained to homeschool leaders by the Legislative Counsel Bureau when the homeschool law was passed. To "prepare" means to "make ready", to "get ready", to "equip".

  • C. Should the local school district establish a file for the homeschooled child? Should I?
    NHN02-11-2015

    No, a local school district is not required to keep a file on a homeschooled child. However, if the superintendent of schools receives a Notice of Intent to Homeschool, the school district must maintain a copy of the written acknowledgement, which is given to the parent upon receipt of the notification, for a minimum of 15 years. The parent, or child (when he/she turns 18 years of age), or a person specified by the parent (all requiring suitable identification), or the courts, may request a copy of the written acknowledgement or any other records pertaining to the child, and the district must process that request within 5 days. (NRS 392.700 #7 and #8)

     

    The parent however, should keep and maintain an accurate and up to date file of the child's educational progress. These records should include a copy of the NOI to Homeschool, the receipt for submission of the NOI from the school district, any "proof of mailings" received from the US Post Office as well as any other pertinent records regarding the child's education.

     

    Good records on the education provided to the child and his/her progress through the homeschool years should be kept by the parent to provide back-up to any year-end grades, certificates of completion, and/or diplomas you present your child.  Your child will need at a minimum his High School Diploma showing he/she has completed their homeschool program.  Colleges, vocational schools, employers, and others often request to see the student's proof of graduation from high school, be sure both he/she and you have a copy.

     

    Yearly records should include: the subjects taught; days of instruction (no legal requirement, but a similar number of days used in public/private schools is recommended, though the length of these days may vary [and some children may take a shorter or longer amount of time to master the subject]); scores/grades on any course tests; end of course exams; and/or annual standardized exam taken by the child should be kept in a portfolio for your child along with examples of his/her work that you feel shows academic progress.  Report cards are helpful K-6, and transcripts for middle school and high school a must.

     

    There are many sources for RECORD KEEPING available to homeschool parents through the internet, and/or curriculum resource providers.  See our "Resource, Catalogs, and Magazines" tab for links. HSLDA has Preschool - 8th grade record keeping and High School record keeping & transcript information in their Teaching My Kids webpage, click on the appropriate grade level for your child.

  • D. What information is the local school district required to make available to a homeschooling parent? What about college entrance exams?
    NHN02-11-2015

    The local district is required to make available the Nevada Department of Education Notice of Intent to Homeschool Form.

    In addition, they are required to provide information on their website, in a timely manner, regarding the High School Proficiency Exam* and all college entrance exams such as the S.A.T, the A.C.T. and the PSAT/NMSQT, including registration dates and examination dates. (NRS 388D.020 and 388D.040). The Nevada Dept. of Ed website has a listing of each district’s website.

    "Homeschool Code" for the following tests:

    ACT is 969-999, parent signs student up online, test can be taken at any participating location offered: http://www.act.org/content/act/en/products-and-services/the-act.html

    SAT is 970000, parent signs student up online, test may be taken at any participating location offered: https://collegereadiness.collegeboard.org/sat

    PSAT we believe goes by state... need have to look that one up and/or contact the Nevada Department of Education or your school district office.  See PSAT/NMSQT or PSAT 10 tab here, https://collegereadiness.collegeboard.org/sat

    Each parent would register and pay online and then the student would take the test at the site you registered for.

    *The HSPE is no longer required for public school students graduating in 2017 or later.  If a homeschool student completed their homeschool program in 2016 or earlier they must take the NV-HSPE to qualify for the Nevada Millennium Scholarship along with either the SAT or the ACT.  Students completing their homeschool program 2017 or later need only take the SAT or ACT to apply for the Millennium Scholarship.

  • E. Does the School District have any other responsibilities?
    Matt02-11-2015

    Yes. They are required by federal law to conduct Child Find - identifying children with special needs. Whether or not you, as the homeschooling parent, allows an evaluation or services to be provided is strictly up to you.

  • 4.Homeschooling the Child
  • A. What subjects are parents required to teach in their homeschool? What about record keeping?
    Matt02-11-2015

    NRS 388D.050 requires the basic subjects of English, including reading, composition and writing, mathematics, science and social studies, including history, geography, economics and government. These subjects may be taught as the parent determines is appropriate for the age and skill level of the child and do not need to comply with Nevada state standards for public schools.

     

    For assistance in writing an educational plan or choosing instructional materials parents may find other homeschool parents, the local library, or the Internet helpful. Enter the words "homeschooling in Nevada" in the search engine for a listing of local, regional, or state homeschool organizations with resources available to homeschoolers in your area. These websites usually offer free services as a support to the homeschooling community.  NHN has archived a helpful link from World Book listing a "traditional course of study" (not Common Core).

     

    Lastly, good records on the education provided to the child and his/her progress through the years should be kept to provide back-up to any year-end grades, certificates of completion, and/or diplomas you present your child.  Good record keeping protects both you and your child in a competive world.  Records kept should include

    • subjects taught
    • days of instruction (no legal requirement, but a similar number of days used in public/private schools is recommended, though the actual total number of days may vary [some children may take a shorter or longer amount of time to master the subject])
    • scores/grades on any course exams, end of course exams, and/or annual standardized exam taken by the child should be kept in a portfolio for your child along with examples of his/her work that you feel show progress.
    • Report cards are helpful K-6, and transcripts for middle school and high school a must.

     

    There are many sources for RECORD KEEPING available to homeschool parents through the internet, and/or curriculum resource providers.  See our "Resource, Catalogs, and Magazines" tab for links. HSLDA has Preschool - 8th grade record keeping and High School record keeping & transcript information in their Teaching My Kids webpage, click on the appropriate grade level for your child.

  • B. Is there a specified amount of time a homeschooled child is required to receive instruction?
    Matt02-11-2015

    No. Homeschooled children are exempt from the number of days a child is required to attend public school. They are also exempt from a “minutes per day of instruction” requirement required of public school students.

     

    It is recognized that in a tutorial education program such as homeschooling a student can generally accomplish more in a shorter period of time than in a group setting. By law, the public school year runs from July 1 to June 30. Most homeschool parents use a traditional academic schedule as a starting point and then tailor the amount of instructional time as needed for each child. Some children may need more time to master a skill, others less. That is what makes homeschooling unique and such a success. You may follow a traditional nine month calendar or follow your own year round schedule within that twelve month period.

  • C. May the parent of a homeschooled child request information regarding public school curriculum from the local school board/district?
    Matt02-11-2015

    Yes. Parents may seek information about the school curriculum from the local school board/district. If the parent requests such information, the board/district must provide it since a district’s curriculum is a matter of public record (NRS 390, NAC 390). The district, however, is not obligated to provide books and materials to a homeschooled student.

  • D. Are parents required to work with a consultant during their homeschooling?
    Matt02-11-2015

    No, there is no law requiring a parent to work with a consultant or certified teacher in the State of Nevada. The information required by law in the Notice of Intent to Homeschool is basic and designed to be easily completed by the parent without the assistance of an “expert”.

     

    The homeschooling parent may choose to use correspondence programs, computer programs, textbooks, the internet, library resources, licensed teachers, co-ops, tutors, specialty instructors, or any other resources the parent deems appropriate to meet the educational needs of their child, but it is the parent who directs the education of the child.  Further, "homeschooling" is self-funded and the parent maintains the freedom to choose appropriate educational methods for the child.

     

    There are many local, regional and statewide homeschool organizations available to assist a new homeschooling parent. Many of these groups have websites or are listed in the telephone directory. Talking with someone else who is a veteran homeschooler will give you an opportunity to find out how to get started and learn about the many valuable resources available to you according to the educational style you choose to use in your homeschool. The NHN website is listed at the beginning of this document for more assistance should you need it, and it contains sample educational plans that you may use when developing a plan for your child.

  • E. Is the parent required to have a teaching license or any special training?
    Matt02-11-2015

    No. The parent is not required to have a teaching license or any special training. You do need to be the parent or legal guardian (See NRS 388D.010). You have a constitutional and legal right to direct the education of your child.

     

    Many times parents new to homeschooling are faced with a barrage of information on how to homeschool their children and are easily overwhelmed by all the choices. NHN believes that the best resource for new homeschoolers is OTHER homeschoolers who are already educating their own children. Local homeschool support groups and co-ops are a wonderful resource for new homeschoolers. NHN maintains a list of current groups on our website Support Group page conveniently divided by Nevada Counties.

     

    With the advent of the internet there is a plethora of resources available to homeschoolers. Often times well-intentioned retired teachers/bureaucrats peddle educational programs or tutoring services to unsuspecting homeschool parents. We say, “buyer beware”. Over the years we have noticed two things about these educational programs or services that concern us:

    1. The perception amongst bureaucrats that homeschoolers lack “professional” programs or services, a void that only they can fill.
    2. Parents new to homeschooling may have feelings of guilt for withdrawing or keeping their children out of the government school system and unnecessarily think they should avail themselves of these “professional” programs/services.

     

    NHN encourages you to contact other homeschoolers before purchasing any program and/or using “professional” services. Ask what others have done to meet the educational needs of their children: homeschool moms love to give advice and make recommendations based on what worked or didn’t work for their own children

  • F. Can someone else homeschool my child?
    Matt02-11-2015

    One cannot “have” their child homeschooled by someone else. NRS 385.007 #3 and NRS 392.070 #1b define homeschooling, and when combined: "Homeschooled child means a child who receives instruction at home... (when) A parent of the child chooses to provide education to the child..." The parent assumes full responsibility for the education of their child by signing the Notice of Intent to Homeschool, and must provide the education. Providing the education means the parent can do their own teaching, or use others (such as a tutor), or have the child take classes (such as at a homeschool co-op, a private or public school, a civic or community group, a private organization, etc), or use a correspondence or online course, or do whatever else the parent deems necessary. The parent, not another person, organization, or school, is the one who has direct managerial control of the child's education.

     

    NRS 394.103 "Private schools" defined. "Private schools" means private elementary and secondary educational institutions. The term does not include a home in which instruction is provided to a child who is excused from compulsory attendance pursuant to subsection 1 of NRS 392.070.

     

    NRS 394.351 Unlawful acts. It is unlawful for any person, alone or in concert with others, to: 3. Instruct or educate, or offer to instruct or educate (including advertising or soliciting for such purpose), enroll or offer to enroll, or contract with any person for such purpose, or award any educational credential, or contract with any institution or party to perform any such act in this state, whether the person is located within or outside this state, unless such person complies with the minimum standards set forth in NRS 394.241 and the regulations adopted by the Board.

     

    NRS 385.007  Definitions. [Effective July 1, 2016.]  As used in this title, unless the context otherwise requires:

          3.  “Homeschooled child” means a child who receives instruction at home and who is exempt from compulsory attendance pursuant to NRS 392.070, but does not include an opt-in child.

    NRS 392.070 (Attendance at public school must be excused when) (#1b) "A parent of the child chooses to provide education to the child and files a Notice of Intent to Homeschool the child..."

     

    NRS 388D.020 [5c] by signing he/she "…assumes full responsibility for the education of the child while the child is being homeschooled."

  • G. Are there any testing requirements of homeschooled children in Nevada?
    Matt02-11-2015

    No, the parent assumes full responsibility for the education of the child, including the financial burden, and therefore is best suited to determine the educational needs of the child, not the state. Public school students are tested as a method of "accountability" to the taxpayer who funds public schools.

    However, many parents choose to periodically administer standardized tests or some other form of evaluation to determine the academic progress of their child and use in future planning. Additionally, many homeschooled children are in different grade levels for different subjects, thereby limiting the usefulness of standardized tests.

    Some local homeschool support groups/co-ops offer annual testing using nationally standardized tests such as the Iowa Test of Basic Skills (ITBS). HSLDA offers a great deal of information and resources regarding standardized testing.  Other types of exams or academic evaluations may be used, such as those available from www.familylearning.org (800) 405-8378.

    College entrance exams:

    • Though not required, a homeschooler may take college entrance exams offered in this state such as the Scholastic Aptitude Test - SAT, the American College Test - ACT, the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test - PSAT and the National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test - NMSQT.
    • A homeschool student seeking the Nevada Millennium Scholarship must take and achieve minimum scores on the SAT or ACT, see question 19. Homeschool students graduating in 2016 or earlier must also take and pass the Nevada High School Proficiency Exam to qualify for the MS.
    • The school district is required by law to post all college entrance exam dates and locations on their website for all children in the district, including those available to homeschooled children. Contact your district for information on signups and test dates for the High School Proficiency Exam (only students graduating 2016 or earlier) as well as college entrance exam test dates (NRS 392.700 #11) . You can find your school district’s website on the NV Dept. of Ed website:  http://www.doe.nv.gov/
    • All homeschooled students, especially those who are academically gifted, who are entering their junior year of high school, should consider taking the PSAT/NMSQT (National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test) at the local high school. National Merit Scholars are highly sought by the most prestigious universities. The local district is required to make information available on their district website to homeschoolers in a timely manner regarding signups for the PSAT/NMSQT (NRS 392.700 #11).
  • H. Does a homeschooled child receive a public high school diploma from a local school district? Or do I award the high school diploma? Can I produce my child's high school transcript?
    Barbara Dragon18-03-2017
    • No. A homeschooled child will not receive a public school high school diploma. A diploma is a certificate that says the student has completed a certain course of study. Homeschooled children have completed a course of study in compliance with NRS 388D.050, and are therefore eligible to receive a diploma from the parents or from an institution employed by the parents such as a correspondence course or online private high school.
    • Homeschool parents may choose to review their local school district's "graduation requirements" for current public school high schools, a Nevada private high school, or an online private high school, or devise their own requirements based on the minimal courses required under NRS 388D.050 suitable for the needs of their child to become a productive member of society.
    • A student may choose to pursue a college degree, vocational training, and/or move directly into the workforce after completing his/her homeschool program. And many homeschool students actually begin taking "dual-credit" courses at local community colleges or preparing for vocational training during the high school years.
    • Yes, parents can and should formulate the student's transcripts and diploma to meet their home education goals. For more information see the NHN Guide to Homeschooling High School.
    • After completion of a child's homeschool high school program, the parent issues the diploma. However, "officials" later in life may question the diploma as not "real."  Here is the answer to such statements: In NV, under the "homeschool option" (NRS 392.070, subsection 2) the parent is the director of the child's education. Period.  The parent assumes full responsibility for the child's education.  As such the parent advances the student, issues a diploma and any required paperwork just the same as a Nevada private school (NRS 392.070, subsection 1).  To not recognized a diploma issued to a homeschool student by the parent in Nevada would be a form of discrimination against the student.
    • For more information on producing the homeschool child's high school transcript and diploma topic, we encourage parents to visit our Guide to Homeschooling High School as well as these websites: https://www.hslda.org/highschool/default.asp, (legal issues, high school transcripts, grad products),  www.homeschooldiplomas.com (grad products) or www.learninfreedom.org (general info).
  • I. May a homeschooled student apply for the Millennium Scholarship?
    Matt02-11-2015

    Yes, a homeschooled student is eligible to apply for the Nevada Millennium Scholarship. Homeschool students are “Application for Homeschooled Students” on the State Treasurer’s website.

    To qualify a homeschooled student must provide:

    1. A “certificate of completion” from the homeschool program, this may be a “home produced” certificate or diploma or a GED if applicable. Also refer to Question 18 regarding the high school diploma.
    2. A copy of the school district’s written acknowledgment of exemption from compulsory attendance.
    3. A copy of the results of the Nevada High School Proficiency Exam (homeschool students are not required to take the HSPE unless applying for the Millennium Scholarship) if the student completed his/her homeschool program in 2016 or earlier. For public high school graduates in 2017 or later the HSPE is no longer given, so homeschoolers completing their homeschool program during the 2016-2017 school year will not have to submit results for that test.  For 2016 or earlier homeschool grads, contact your local school district (or any public school district in the state) to sign up for the HSPE. The exam is/was given during certain "windows" of time so be sure to plan ahead so that your student has the exam results prior to applying for the scholarship.
    4. A copy of the results of either the ACT (minimum score of 21) or the SAT (minimum score of 990 if taken before March, 2016 or a minimum score of 1070 if taken in or after March 2016). You may register online to take either the ACT or SAT.
    5. A copy of official public/private high school transcripts ONLY if the homeschooled student was ever enrolled in a public or private high school or took any classes there under the Notification of Participation clause. The student must meet the GPA requirement; i.e. a 3.0 if graduating 2004 or earlier, 3.1 in 2005 or 06, and 3.25 graduating 2007 or later for all classes taken at a public or licensed private high school. If a homeschool student took any classes at a public/private high school or was enrolled full time in a public/private high school for any part of their high school career their cumulative GPA for those classes must be equal to or greater than the GPA requirement for public/private high school graduates applying for the scholarship depending upon the year they graduate from their homeschool high school program.
    6. When all the necessary documents have been collected download and print an application from the Nevada State Treasure's website . Fill out the application and return it, along with the above required documents, as applicable to your student, directly to the Millenium Scholarship office via fax or US mail service. Homeschool students do not apply through the local high school for the scholarship. The Scholarship office will notify the student when the scholarship status has been determined. If the student qualifies then when he/she registers for classes through the WEB-REG system (online) at a community college in Nevada, Nevada State College, UNR (E-PAWs), or UNLV (Online Registration) the student will have the opportunity to click on a Millennium Scholarship button to activate payment of credits (up to 12 per semester to total amount granted) through the MS Program.
    7. The Governor's Millennium Scholarship office is VERY friendly to homeschoolers and will answer all your questions if you contact them. However, they sometimes make mistakes in the information given, especially after an election year when a new staff has come on board.  So always check with NHN if you receive any information contrary to this FAQ.

    For the latest information, go to the Millennium Scholarship website at www.nevadatreasurer.gov

  • 5.Homeschooling and the Public School
  • A. May a homeschooled child participate in programs of special education and related services through the public school?
    Matt02-11-2015

    In cases of special education, Nevada law (NRS392.070 #2) equates a homeschooled child to a private school child for purposes of Nevada and Federal special education laws and regulations. Under these laws, a homeschooled child is not entitled to any or all of the services that would be provided by a FAPE (Free Appropriate Public Education) of the local public school. Some districts do supplement the Federal special education funding so that private and homeschooled children do receive all necessary services, but they are not required to.

     

    Instead, after a homeschooled child has been “identified” via the Child Find provisions of IDEA (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act), the local public school district consults with homeschool and private school representatives to determine how the Federal funding allocated to home and private school students will be distributed. The greater the number of homeschooled children who have been identified, the greater the proportionate amount of Federal funding that will be provided to the homeschooled segment. Unlike a public schooled child, not every homeschooled child is entitled to receive services. For those homeschooled children who do receive services, with final determination by the local district, the district will develop either a services plan or an IEP (Individualized Educational Program), and services are provided. A services plan as defined in Federal Regulations is not to be confused with an Individualized Family Service Plan for children under three years of age.

     

    For more information, support, and Child Find phone numbers, please refer to NHN's Special Needs Homeschooling webpage. NRS 392.070 regulates programs of special education and related services for homeschooled children.

  • B. The local school district is sending me letters and forms to fill out for special needs children. Am I required to fill out and return these?
    Matt02-11-2015

    No. If you do not wish to receive any services, you do not have to return any of these, whether the district is aware of a special needs child in your home or not. If you wish to ask for special education services from the local public school district, you must fill these out and return them.

     

    The district is required by Federal law to comply with the Child Find process, but you are not required to respond or have your child “identified” as having special needs in any way if you do not wish. If you should decide to have your child identified as a special needs child, you still are not required to receive services from the district and may refuse them if they are offered. The advantage to having your special needs child identified, and then not partaking of any services that might be offered, is that more funding will now be made available for other homeschooled special needs children. However, you are under no obligation to participate for this reason. Once your child has been identified you do not need to have your child re-identified for 3 years. Even for public schooled children, Nevada law specifies that a district may not require a child to take advantage of special education programs under certain circumstances (NRS 388.460).

  • C. Is there Gifted testing and what services are available for my homeschooled child?
    Matt02-11-2015

    The public school districts are not responsible for, nor will they, test an non-enrolled child for Gifted abilities. However, our homeschooled (or private schooled) children can be evaluated outside of the public school, at the parent's expense.

     

    While there are many places within the community that offer this type of testing, many people choose to use their local University Psychology Dept testing as it is usually the most affordable. UNLV and UNR both offer this. Once an outside evaluation is done, the services MAY be provided. The parent meets with the principal of the school to determine if space is available.

     

    Sadly, all the schools can usually offer their gifted students is in the form of a pull out class, grades 3, 4 and 5. Once a child hits middle school there is no GATE program, they just take more advanced classes.

    Listed below are some resources in this area:

  • D. May a homeschooled child participate in classes, extra-curricular activities, and/or sports at the public school or charter school?
    Matt02-11-2015

    Yes. Nevada Revised Statute 392.070 #3-6 (for public schools) and NRS 386.580 #5-6 (for public charter schools), allow participation in classes and extracurricular activities. Districts and charter schools are reimbursed by the Nevada State Department of Education for each class (up to three) taken by a homeschooled child in accordance with the provisions of NRS 387.1233 #8.

     

    Sports are a special type of extracurricular activity and are handled separately in Nevada Revised Statutes. NRS 392.070 #3-6 and 386.420 to 386.470 apply to interscholastic activities and events which includes sports. Interscholastic is defined as existing or conducted between or among schools.

     

    The Flow Chart in the NHN memo is useful to determine a homeschooled child's eligibility to participate, along with further reading, which is imperative for understanding what the law allows.

     

    Whether a homeschool child participates in a public school class, activity, or sport the Notification Of Intent to Participate in Programs and Activities (NOIPPA) Form is always used instead of an "enrollment form" for public school students.  Be sure to print the form when making a request for your homeschooled child to participate.  The form is also available through the NV Dept. of Education - Homeschooling.

  • E. Since homeschoolers are allowed by law to take classes at a charter school if space is available, can classes be taken from one of Nevada's "virtual" charter schools?
    Matt02-11-2015

    No. Referring to a homeschooled child, the law says in NRS 386.580 #5c, "A charter school shall not authorize such a child to participate in a class or activity through a program of distance education provided by the charter school pursuant to NRS 388.820 to 388.874, inclusive." In NRS 388.850 #3 the law says that a child who is being homeschooled is not eligible to enroll in or attend a program of distance education, and NRS 388.826 defines distance education as "instruction which is delivered by means of video, computer, television, or the Internet or other electronic means of communication, or any combination thereof, in such a manner that the person supervising or providing the instruction and the pupil receiving the instruction are separated geographically for a majority of the time during which instruction is delivered."

  • F. May a homeschooled child take distance education classes?
    Matt02-11-2015

    It depends on who is sponsoring the Distance Education. NRS 388.850 #3 and NRS 386.580 #4 specifically exclude a homeschooled child from a distance education program that is sponsored by the local Nevada school district or a Nevada charter school as defined in NRS 388.829. A homeschooler may use a Distance Education program offered by any other entity, in state or out of state, because the distance education courses in NRS 388 that homeschoolers are excluded from apply only to Nevada's System of Public Instruction.

  • G. A charter or other public school is offering “education at home” where I educate my child at home and they provide the supplies, correspondence program and/or computer program with a licensed teacher to help periodically. Is this homeschooling?
    Matt02-11-2015

    No. These schools are governed by Nevada Revised Statutes other than NRS 392.070 and 392.700 which are specific to homeschoolers. Under Nevada law a parent of a homeschooled child assumes full responsibility for the education of their child while homeschooling. Charter and public schools operate under other Nevada laws and regulations and have other requirements. Some charter and public schools offer Independent Study programs and Distance Education programs where children who are enrolled in those schools receive education at home, but the education is directed by the public or charter school, not the parent.

  • 6.Enrolling in private or public/charter schools after homeschooling
  • A. May a homeschooled child enroll in a private or public school after being homeschooled for a time?
    Matt02-11-2015

    Yes, a homeschool student may enroll in a private or public school after homeschooling for a time. However, there are many things a parent should know:

    Private Schools K-12 develop their own enrollment policies.  Please contact the private school you are considering when choosing not to homeschool any longer.

    Public Schools K-12 are required to accept any child that is enrolled in the public school system.

    • Laws (Nevada Revised Statutes - NRS, written by the Legislature, approved by the Governor) and regulations (Nevada Administrative Code - NAC, written by "state boards" to explain the NRS) have been enacted to give the local district some guidelines on the placement of a child who is new to the school.
    • Local districts, in turn, develop policies to implement those laws and regulations.
    • Enrollment in K-6 is generally at the “age-appropriate” grade level.  However,placement tests may be employed to best determine the appropriate grade level dependent on the student’s abilities.*
    • Enrollment in middle school or junior high is also generally determined by age however, regulations calling for completion of some required courses prior to advancement to high school may require additional evaluation of the student’s completed coursework and/or other evaluation prior to determining grade level placement.
    • Homeschool students having completed the 8th grade at home and enrolling in a public high school at the start of 9th grade, in the past, have generally taken a placement test to determine the suitable level of placement within a specific 9th grade course, such as English, math, or science. However, by statute, there are now some courses required of 8th grade public school students to be completed prior to being promoted to 9th grade in the public school.  Parents planning to enroll their student in the public high school should contact the school while the student is in 7th grade at home in order to meet these requirements during 8th grade at home. [See next bullet for more information.]
    • Homeschool students enrolling in a public high school in the middle of 9th grade or later may ask the school to evaluate the coursework already completed by the student in the homeschool, placement tests may also be used.
      • Many of the school districts in Nevada are resistant to allowing credits earned in a “non-accredited” institution such as homeschool high school.
      • However, the law DOES require the district to consider these credits through various tools as a means of non-discrimination against the student, NRS 388D.040.  NRS 389.171 was amended during the 2017 Legislative session allowing for more course review methods but as of 8/17/17 this statute has not been updated in the Legislative.  To see amended version of NRS 389.171 see AB 110, Section 1.8.
      • NHN recommends that parents consult with an attorney should the school not accept credits earned in the homeschool when the student can clearly demonstrate mastery.

     

    Download our FLOW CHART for "enrollment in a public school after homeschooling" to help determine which laws and regulations apply.

     

    *NOTE:  A child who did not attend a public or private Kindergarten or First Grade in this state (non-notified homeschooling), but are citizens of Nevada, may be required by the school district to take a developmental screening test to determine "readiness" for Kindergarten, First, or Second grade upon enrollment (NRS 392.040 Section 4-6).  However, since the statute specifically refers to a child whose parent submitted a "waiver from enrollment before the compulsory attendance age of 7" to the local school district, and the parent is seeking to enroll the child in a public school at age 7, it is unclear whether the "non-notified" homeschooled child is required by law to be assessed (An NOI to Homeschool is to be submitted when the child turns age 7 or is withdrawn from a public school between the ages of 5 and 18).  NHN recommends consultation with an attorney if the parent is unwilling to have their child assessed for readiness by the public school but wishes to enroll the child in the age-appropriate grade; 1st grade for 6 year old, 2nd grade for 7 year old.  It is our understanding that children age 8 and above are placed into their age-appropriate grade level upon enrollment in a public school.  Again, seek legal counsel if you are not sure of your parental rights to determine grade placement in cooperation with the public school.

     

    Laws (NRS - Nevada Revised Statute) take precedent over regulations (NAC - Nevada Administrative Code). Since the laws and regulations both change over time, it is highly recommended that you or a legal professional check them if a particular situation requires definitive answers.

    NRS references are available at http://www.leg.state.nv.us/NRS/

    NAC references are available at http://www.leg.state.nv.us/NAC/CHAPTERS.HTML

    When NACs (regulations) are changed, a process for proposed and adopted regulations is followed that includes posting on the State's legislative website before being codified into their final form on the above website. You can view them at http://www.leg.state.nv.us/Register/.

  • B. May a child skip a grade after being homeschooled upon enrollment in a public school if the parent can prove the child is academically capable?
    Matt02-11-2015

    The policies of each school district vary, and it is within the discretion of the local district, within the applicable laws and regulations, to determine the grade level where a child is placed.

  • 7.Applying for active duty in the Military after being homeschooled
  • A. Will the military accept men and women with a Homeschool Diploma?
    Matt02-11-2015

    Yes. Currently, homeschoolers fall under a great 4 year pilot program. This program allows for your child, who scores 50 or above on the Armed Forces Qualification Test, to be automatically placed in Tier 1. Students scoring lower may still enlist, but only as Tier 2 recruits.

     

    There are "guidelines for homeschooled students" for nearly every branch of the military, available online. These guidelines discuss the specifics of what the particular branch is looking for, but the common theme is that "home schooled students compete against the same standards as students coming from a traditional school setting" (Air Force Academy website).

     

    Air Force Academy Guidelines for Homeschool Students

    United States Naval Academy

     

    We do suggest you bring copies of these policies/Memos with you when visiting with recruiters. In this case it would be the Memo from the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense.

     

    Some links of interest:

    http://www.hslda.org/docs/news/hslda/200601/200602010.asp http://nche.hslda.org/docs/news/hslda/200707030.asp